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Timeth Quet
Fri Apr 27 2012, 12:54AM


Steam Alias: Timeth Quet
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Because cooking salmon like a normal person is for pussies









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Timeth Quet
Sat Jun 02 2012, 03:33PM


Steam Alias: Timeth Quet
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Slow Roasted Copper River Salmon - Chive, mustard and skin crisps, asparagus, herb jus, 25-year balsamic

I had my birthday dinner last week at this really nice restaurant that really follows the idea of sourcing all of it's ingredients locally, which of course also means it's all seasonal. And of course, around the memorial day weekend everyone in Seattle looks forward to one thing more than anything else-- the arrival of Copper River salmon, arguably the highest quality salmon in the world. One such course I had at this restaurant was salmon that was cooked incredibly slowly at low temperatures-- 165 degrees for 10 minutes. Just enough to barely cook the inside of the salmon and keep the incredible firmness and fattiness of the Copper river salmon in tact. On the plate it almost looks raw and has an absolutely gorgeous look about it. Inspired by this dish I decided to do my own spin on it. This time I basted the salmon with 25-year balsamic to help cut the richness of the fish. Accompanying it are crisps of chive, stone-ground mustard and the skin of the salmon. The sauce is dill, tarragon, parsley and chive with an apple reduction and thickened with xantana (xanthum gum) to give it a sauce-like consistency to it. Finally, to keep seasonal I went with some beautiful Yakima Valley asparagus.











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Timeth Quet
Thu Jun 28 2012, 07:36PM


Steam Alias: Timeth Quet
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"Berries n' Cream"

I've been in a bit of a sweet kick lately, and thought it would be a good excuse to use a couple new techniques I've learned lately. The first being sorbets and ice creams with dried ice. The key to any good frozen dessert is for it to be perfectly smooth-- this much is common sense and something anyone who's had ice cream before could tell you. The only way to get smooth ice cream and sorbets is by freezing it as quickly as possible: the faster it freezes the less time there is for ice crystals to form. Fortunately, dried ice freezes things in less than a minute and as such creates a texture that's hard to beat (liquid nitrogen is the only way that's faster, but I don't have easy access to that.) Using this technique I created a strawberry sorbet.

The second technique is a no-bake custard. This is useful for two reasons. The first being from a professional stand point, lets say we sell 80 creme brulees a night, but only have 40 ramekins. That means half way through service another 40 must be made, which takes an hour to bake, and another hour to cool down. That is to say it's a pain in the ass. Now that you no longer have to bake your custards, you can mold them in ANYTHING. I used PVC pipe because it's absurdly cheap and I can cut it to any size I want. The technique itself is easy: Bring my cream, sugar to a boil, and blend in Iota Carageenan. (This is a type of Irish moss and used in a similar way as gelatin) Within minutes I have a product with the exact texture of custard in any shape I want. It's pretty incredible.

To accompany these two components I have a lemon French Merinque that I've baked till crispy and a basil 'merinque' that's been baked till crispy and 'frais de bois' or wild strawberries which are in season in Washington right now for 3 weeks and beyond amazing. I use the term merinque lightly for the basil one because for this I made a basil infused simply syrup that I then whipped into stiff peaks with 'Methylcellulose' which is a food stabalizer. The end result is the texture of a merinque but tasting intensely of basil.















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frostmute
Thu Jun 28 2012, 10:10PM


Steam Alias: frostmute
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O.O

Holy shit I want that in my mouth







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Timeth Quet
Fri Jun 29 2012, 01:37AM


Steam Alias: Timeth Quet
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The sorbet is totally doable from home if you're able to find dry ice (shouldn't be too difficult, or at least it isn't where I live.)

10 cups hulled and quarter'd strawberries (preferably wild, but the regular ones from the store work)

1 1/2 cup sugar

1 teaspoon citric acid

Combine ingredients and let macerate for an hour in the fridge. Puree in blender on high speed for 3 minutes until completely smooth. Strain.

Using a kitchen aid mixer with a whisk attachment mix in crushed dry ice and mix on medium high speed for one minute, or until frozen. Voila!

It can be kept in the freezer for a week as long as it's in an airtight container. I recomend leaving it out of the freezer for at least 10-15 minutes before eating to allow it to get the right texture back.







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Timeth Quet
Fri Aug 24 2012, 10:01PM


Steam Alias: Timeth Quet
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New York of Beef, roasted with pickled and glazed baby vegetables, red wine braised onion pudding, blackberry jus

A fairly straight forward dish this time since I was recently promoted to the meat station at my work. I marinated the New York roast for three days in a savory herbs, garlic and shallots, seared it off and basted it in brown butter and slow roasted it at 300 F till medium rare. It is accompanied by an assortment of pickled and glazed mushrooms and baby vegetables I found in season at the Farmers Market. The onions are cooked down slowly for hours in a blend of red wine vinegar, port and Cabernet. It is then thickened to a pudding consistency. The sauce is a veal stock reduced down with sherry and balsamic vinegar, red wine and blackberries from my front yard.













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Denver Dave
Fri Sep 07 2012, 01:20AM


Steam Alias: Danger Dave[BONG]
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I made another cake today, thought you might get a kick out of this one. The top two layers are butter pecan and the bottom one is a mocha fudge brownie all with a cream cheese frosting.

It just says "Cake" on the top, in case anybody was trying to figure it out.







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DrakeMegrim
Fri Sep 07 2012, 09:46AM


Steam Alias: WD!!! Drake
Class: Demoman
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Nom!







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Dejil
Sat Sep 08 2012, 01:42AM


Steam Alias: Dejil
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That looks amazing!







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Timeth Quet
Mon Sep 24 2012, 02:24PM


Steam Alias: Timeth Quet
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Squab- Roasted with variations of corn, blueberries, onion

A couple weeks ago I came across some beautiful farm fresh whole pigeons intact with the head, feet and guts inside. This inspired me to do a more artistic presentation. I kept the feet and talons on the bird, and then slow cooked the legs after briefly curing them in some chicken fat. These were fried just before serving to crisp the skin. The breast themselves were partially roasted on the bone, cooled and carved off. I finished them in the pan with some brown butter and other aromats. The bones, liver and kidneys were used for the sauce, which I laced with a cassis syrup and blueberries I have growing in my backyard.

Accompanying the squab are variations of corn - pickled, freeze dried, a pudding and smoked. Variations of blueberries - pickled, dehydrated, roasted. Variations of onion - pickled and roasted.

The hope here was to bring some level of intentional discomfort and morbidness to the guest-- I like the idea of forcing them to come face to face that at one point what is on their plate was alive and running around. Plus it's fucking cool looking.











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